Over Watering

In most areas that we are working in, we have been experiencing a dryer than average year and increased needs for irrigation. Whether your course is getting natural occurring irrigation (rain water) or having to supplement the rainfall with irrigation, applying the correct amount of irrigation is one of the toughest jobs that a superintendent has to face.
Overwatering occurs for many reasons but one of the biggest is the fear of getting too dry and the tendency is to keep it wet. A great water source and well-drained soils can usually tolerate this a lot more than a course with poor water quality such as a secondary treatment facility or well water that is high in salt. The down side is that nothing good comes out of overwatering golf courses, especially the putting surfaces. Read more

Golf Course Maintenance
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Improving Patch Faces Removal Of Trees

(AUGUSTA,GA) Member Tim Martin has played at the Patch for years, he says the course is now on a roll.

“This course is in the best shape that it’s ever been in the greens keeper and his staff have just done a tremendous job,” said Martin. Golf Course Maintenance

Martin isn’t alone in praising The Patch, (AKA) The Augusta Municipal Golf Course.

“We probably have the best green right now short of the masters and it’s improved a tremendous amount,” said Earnest Workman walking to the 10th green.

But golfers are starting to notice all the trees that are tied with orange ribbon. Read more

Golf Course Agronomic Consulting
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Conditions continue to improve at Augusta Municipal Golf Course

Flipping through a red photo album, John Fogel’s chuckle grew louder each time he turned a page. Inside the book were before-and-after photos of the greens at Augusta Municipal Golf Course, starting in early-2014 and going through the present.

Golfers make putts on the practice green at the Augusta Municipal Golf Course. The course has 82 members. MICHAEL HOLAHAN/STAFFMICHAEL HOLAHAN/STAFF
Golfers make putts on the practice green at the Augusta Municipal Golf Course. The course has 82 members.

“You can’t help but laugh a little about how far this place has come since 2014,” said Fogel, president of Cypress Golf Management, which was put in charge of improving the course on July 1, 2014. “It’s remarkable. The Augusta community has really embraced what we’ve done and it’s amazing to see how proud people have become of this course. Many people have golfed here for years, and hearing their compliments is what makes everything worthwhile.” Read more

Golf Maintenance

CEOs to hold roundtable discussion at 2016 Golf Industry Show in San Diego

Golf Course Superintendents Association of America event focuses on key industry topics

Lawrence, Kan. (Jan. 19, 2016) – Leaders of top golf organizations will join together from 3-4 p.m. Feb. 10 for “CEO Roundtable: Issues and Answers” at the 2016 Golf Industry Show in San Diego. Organized by the Golf Course Superintendents Association of America (GCSAA) and presented in partnership with the National Golf Course Owners Association, the annual Golf Industry Show (GIS) is golf course management’s largest trade show and education conference.

The CEO panel will include chief executive officers Rhett Evans of the GCSAA, Peter Bevacqua of the PGA of America, Jay Karen of the National Golf Course Owners Association, and Jeff Morgan of the Club Managers Association of America. Geoff Shackelford, a contributor to Golf Digest and the Golf Channel, will moderate.

The program will allow these leaders to share their organizations’ specific insights on key industry challenges, including water use, player development and delivering profitability. It will also give the golf industry the opportunity to showcase how allied organizations are working together to strengthen advocacy efforts with governmental policy makers and communicate with golfers of all ages.

“We want to take a look at the key initiatives and challenges that are affecting the golf industry and demonstrate that the leading organizations are committed to working together for the long-term success of the game,” said Evans. “We can’t meet our challenges in a vacuum, and we have to understand each other’s concerns and work together to be successful.”

The 2016 GIS, set for Feb. 6-11, will carry the theme “Everything Under the Sun” and will include the GCSAA Golf Championships, followed by four days of an innovative education conference and trade show at the San Diego Convention Center. The nearly weeklong event is designed for the association’s 17,500 members, golf facility owners and managers, and the industries that market to those facilities.

More than 500 exhibitors are expected, with most coming from the four sectors of equipment, turf applications, golf carts and accessories. The GIS also features marquee events with entertainment, networking and recognition of award winners and industry leaders, including Herbert V. Kohler, executive chairman of Kohler Co., this year’s recipient of the Old Tom Morris Award.

“This is truly the place to be if you are in the golf course management field, as a golf facility owner or an industry partner,” said Evans.

The show is being held in San Diego for the third time in seven years. It was also held in San Diego in 2010 and 2013.The next events are scheduled for Orlando in 2017 and San Antonio in 2018.

The GIS is presented jointly with the National Golf Course Owners Association (NGCOA), along with supporting organizations: the Golf Course Builders Association of America, the American Society of Golf Course Architects, the National Golf Foundation and the United States Golf Association. For more information, visit www.golfindustryshow.com.

About GCSAA and the EIFG
The Golf Course Superintendents Association of America (GCSAA) is a leading golf organization in the United States. Its focus is on golf course management, and since 1926 GCSAA has been the top professional association for the men and women who manage golf courses in the U.S. and worldwide. From its headquarters in Lawrence, Kan., the association provides education, information and representation to nearly 18,000 members in more than 78 countries. The association’s mission is to serve its members, advance their profession and enhance the enjoyment, growth and vitality of the game of golf. Visit GCSAA at www.gcsaa.org or find us on Facebook or Twitter.

The Environmental Institute for Golf is the philanthropic organization of the GCSAA. Its mission is to foster sustainability through research, awareness, education, programs and scholarships for the benefit of golf course management professionals, golf facilities and the game. Visit EIFG at www.eifg.org or find us on Facebook or Twitter.

About the Golf Industry Show
The Golf Course Superintendents Association of America (GCSAA) presents the Golf Industry Show annually. It is an innovative trade show designed for the owners/operators of golf facilities, and the professional members of the golf course and club management industries. Featuring the GCSAA Golf Championships and the GCSAA Education Conference, as well as the largest exhibit floor in the industry, the event combines education, networking and solutions for golf course superintendents, owners/operators, general managers, chief operating officers, architects and builders.

The Golf Industry Show is presented jointly with the National Golf Course Owners Association (NGCOA), along with supporting organizations: the Golf Course Builders Association of America (GCBAA), the American Society of Golf Course Architects (ASGCA), the National Golf Foundation (NGF) and the United States Golf Association (USGA). The 2016 event will be held Feb. 6-11 at the San Diego Convention Center. Visit www.golfindustryshow.com.

Source: GCSAA.org

Golf Course Maintenance Costs

Golf Course Maintenance Costs

Over the past 5 years I cannot tell you how many times I have been asked by a club official, “how can I lower my expenses at my club without sacrificing quality”? More often times than not, my response to that question is “are you efficient in all aspects of your operation and is that communicated that to you by your golf course superintendent”?

While I know that this is answering a question with another question, it makes the club official realize that they may not have all the answers.

I came across an interesting article a while back called “Is it time to Re-think Maintenance Budgets”? What I can tell you about that article is that it touches on many areas of a maintenance operation, of which, the most significant area that states: “So, what can a golf course Owner/Manager or Board of Directors do to control costs?” Read more

Cutting Golf Course Maintenance Costs

Cutting Maintenance Costs Without Sacrificing Quality

“Golf course maintenance, including associated labor, is almost universally the largest single line expense item on a golf course’s operating budget.”

One thing that I get asked all the time in this day and age is “how can I cut my maintenance costs without sacrificing the quality of the product”?

While this is a broad based question, I felt that some ideas that I have seen work over the years may answer this question or at least get everyone thinking of various ways to possibly do that. There are several good articles out there from the GCSAA, the USGA and others that may answer this but here is the skinny:

First it is important to understand what you are asking for and if there is a way to distinguish between the terms cost savings and cost cutting. Usually, cost savings is defined as spending less for a product or service without drastically changing the quality of the course. In golf course maintenance, this can mean that the standard (for the most part) is the same, but a more cost effective way has been found to achieve the result. Cost cutting is usually defined as spending less for a specific product or service that most of the time, reduces the standard. In golf maintenance, this means that the standard could be lowered and less is spent to achieve the new lower standard.

Golf course maintenance, including associated labor, is almost universally the largest single line expense item on a golf course’s operating budget. This is especially true in public sector golf operations, when employee wage and benefit costs are often significantly higher than in the private sector. Therefore, golf course maintenance typically offers public sector golf course owners the greatest potential for savings and increased efficiency.

The only way to truly understand if a club has achieved it full reduction strategy is to perform a labor audit or a time andmotionstudybasedonthenewlevelofstandardthatisplacedonthatareaoftheclub. Therearemanyareasof a golf course that are being maintained that may not be necessary when new standards are being implemented, however each club would need to develop their own levels to see how much of this cost cutting measure it can withstand.

Areas to look at in each portion of the golf course could help better address this situation is as follows:

PUTTING GREENS

• Change holes less frequently, or have the employee change the hole and mows the green. If a triplex is used, it may be necessary to mount the hole changer on the mower.
• Increase mowing heights to reduce stress, limit fungicide and pesticide use, and leave a margin for unusual environmental/weather extremes.
• Alternate mowing and rolling.
• Eliminate or reduce double mowing and use a triplex mower more often and rotate that with rolling operations

TEES and FAIRWAYS

• Eliminate use of walk-behind mowers on tees and increase gang or pull behind units on fairways.
• Move tee markers less frequently.
• Reduce fertility (if applicable.)
• Mow less frequently and incorporate growth regulators (chemicals are cheaper than the fuel and labor associated with mowing.)
• Eliminate over seeding Bermuda grass tees and fairways in winter.
• Don’t collect clippings.
• Use generic herbicides and decrease herbicide applications (establish a new threshold.)

BUNKERS

• Reduce raking frequency and increase the use of touch-up or spot raking.
• Eliminate excessive or unnecessary bunkers and install mounding or depressions instead. Initially requires investment in time and resources.
• Treat perimeters and banks with growth regulators to reduce edging/mowing frequency.

IRRIGATION

• Reduce irrigated areas.
• Understand how the electric utility charges for power and then operate the pumps in the most efficient way.
• Reduce the total amount of water applied. There is a partial kilowatt-hour behind every drop of water applied and having an understanding if savings can be incurred for better optimization.

Keep the focus on the middle of the course. Commit to having fantastic tees, fairways, and greens, even if it means lowering standards in the roughs, woods, and bunkers. While these are just a few to look at initially, it would be up to each golf course superintendent to address his/her clubs opportunities for reduction.

Labor Analysis

The simplest way to do this is to take every task (mowing, cup changing, bunker raking, edging, trimming, etc) and assign a daily, weekly, monthly, and yearly number to the labor hours. Once every task is covered and the new standards are in place, add up the total hours and divide by 2080 hours (result is full time equivalent). This will give your club a bench mark as to how the labor (over 50% of most maintenance budgets) stacks up against the demand of services (tasks).

If you can effectively manage labor you most likely will have better cost controls of your golf course maintenance budget. Simple changes in scheduling labor can be very effective in business cost control in most cases and can save 15-20% of your current labor budget.

Now that you know how your labor stacks up, it is time to get started in some other key areas of the maintenance department. These are:

 Purchasing programs- are national accounts being used and or generic products available?
 Equipment purchases- have you considered re-manufactured or quality used equipment?
 Are you paying replacement values for your labor or are your wages higher than your competitors?  Are you working flex hours and utilizing part time employees?

If you reduced your acreages of fairways, etc., do you now have a better handle on the costs of products?

Over the years, many courses have been working on established budgets and management from a distance. When was the last time a zero based budget was initiated? Are there opportunities at your club to save money?

These are just a few examples to show the many opportunities to trim expenses without sacrificing quality in an operation. Many companies have been doing this type of exercise for years. Before demanding cuts, challenge your golf course superintendent to see areas where he/she can reduce some expenses and to be creative in the process.

If you have any questions, comments, article ideas or would like to discuss the services CGCS provides please do not hesitate to email me at scott.zakany@cgcs.com or call 941-747-5059.

Sincerely,
Scott Zakany, President Cypress Golf Course Services